Ring in 2017 with Five Technology Predictions

December 28, 2016 12:52 pm Published by -

Happy Holidays 2017 Technology Predictions

Well, 2017 is almost upon us. It is also the time of year where we reflect on the previous year, give pause, and think about what we may see in the New Year. This is our look back and look forward. We enjoy trying to predict where the market is going – but to do so with one topic is pretty difficult. So this year, we’re going to make five technology predictions and see how we do.

Looking back at 2016

In late 2015, I made the prediction that 2016 would usher in GIFEE. 2016 certainly did see a marked uptick in the adoption of containers, especially by IT. We crossed over from the technology largely being the domain of developers and their teams to being implemented and supported by operations teams. While everyone did not adopt Kubernetes (the most closely related container orchestration platform to what is actively used by Google) there was far more interest in platforms to support container deployments.

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This post was written by Chris Ciborowski

Stand-alone Containerd is a Win for Everyone

December 14, 2016 5:39 pm Published by -

This morning, Docker has announced that they are extracting the core functionality of the docker engine, called containerd. It has been open sourced under a new project and will be governed by a yet-to-be-named independent foundation. This is a huge win for everyone using containers; from folks building applications using containers to the public clouds and third parties who provide container orchestration. Let’s talk about why.

For those of us who have been working with Docker for a while, we have been witness to some fairly contentious discussions. Many of these revolve around the core component of containers – the container runtime. It is the container runtime that is responsible for determining how a container image should be instantiated as a Linux process, “contained” by the various kernel mechanisms (such as namespaces and cgroups) and made available to the network stack and storage.

Credit: Docker, Inc.

The root of these discussions has been who should determine what should be included in the runtime as well as what should be included. As of late (especially following the 1.12 release of the Docker engine), this hit a fevered pitch and includes strong opinions levied by proponents of Kubernetes. Not to mention talk of forking docker itself.

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This post was written by Chris Ciborowski